Ready… Steady… Sequel Launch! (Dream State Saga Book 2)

DualCoverBack in the Game is now available on Kindle Unlimited over on Amazon!

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Stuck in the Game = Amazon Best Seller!

One last thing before I go…

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199 followers… perfect time for a break!

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Sorry Gold Five, not this time.

With two books down and another in a completely different series on the way, I thought now was the perfect time to do a course on script writing. Because what better way to celebrate getting my work out there than by learning things that will make me regret every single bit of dialogue that I’ve ever written?

*Sigh*

To get my concord fallacy straightened out, I’ve decided to take a hiatus for this course and many other things I’ve been meaning to catch up on for a while. I also feel I’ve been doing a few too many posts on the LitRPG  genre to get attention for my books on the Facebook group that I really need to get over. With so many fantasy books and anime second seasons coming out, I’ll be sure to release more reviews and shit soon enough.

Anyhoo…

What am I hoping to accomplish by announcing this vague break from blogging? My evil plan is get anyone with a sliver of OCD to click follow to get me to that sweet 200 mark, as completely arbitrary as that number is. In fact, the only reason I’m admitting this at the end of this post is to see who actually read it and not just read the title . . . When I was a kid I used to think that because cigarettes were called ‘fags’ I thought ‘faggots’ were just people who smoked. Boy did I get in trouble for calling every smoker I saw a faggot. After realizing what faggot actually meant I always thought the question “Can I bum a fag?” to be a the gayest question ever . . . Sonic the Hedgehog doesn’t look like a hedgehog . . . can turtles have threesomes? Dogs seem lonely when left at home . . . but I guess they are pact animals . . . humping is a funny word.

See ya soon!

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LitRPG Podcast: Back in the Game Review

Review Starts: 22 minutes in

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In Defense of LitRPG

After telling a friend about the LitRPG genre, he asked me, “Why would anyone read a book about someone playing a game when they could just play a game themselves?” This friend was a pretty passionate gamer, for a while it was how he made his living, so I could understand why he would ask such a question. But when thinking of an answer I couldn’t give just one, as I was sure different LitRPG fans enjoyed reading it for different reasons.

Reasons I attempted to convince him of . . . Continue reading

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What’s in a Fantasy First Arc?

TL;DR: The first arc of a fantasy story should create a bridge between the character and the conflict.

Whether a bridge between character and conflict happens in the first chapter or the third or the fifth, as soon as the benefit, trouble or message is hinted at, three things need to occur. First, a key conflict is brought to the protagonist’s awareness. Second, this awareness foreshadows the lead up of the protagonist entering the conflict. Third, the character reacts in a way that either shows reluctance or relevance and becomes aware of their first goal. The reaction itself, like the theme in the prologue, should be indicative to their character.

A good example of this conflict being relayed to the protagonist and the protagonist’s reaction being indicative of their character is in Terry Goodkind’s Richard’s Cypher’s immediate reaction to the journey set upon him in Wizard’s First Rule. Continue reading

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What’s in a Fantasy First Chapter?

(House cleaning tip from Adam over at Write Thoughts on the Fantasy Prologue post: Prologues aren’t always necessary for a hero’s tale, but if included, should come out of necessity, less it slows down the story.)

TL;DR: The first chapter is generally where the main character and the setting is introduced.

If the hero is introduced at a young age, or even at birth, we are generally given a bildungsroman story which always risks the book being shelved under the young adult demographic. The aim in this category is to show a blank slate or innocent that a hostile world/experiences can carve the hero out from. To portray this Tabula Rasa we are given the imagery of fresh, nurturing or growing environments in the beginning. This is why the farm boy archetype was so common in older fantasy, as it can also portray positive down-to-earth traits that can work as the soil from which a hero can grow.

There are many examples of this, David Edding’s The Belgariad, William Goldman’s The Princess Bride, but the one I think is the most generic is Christopher Paolini’s character ‘Eragon’ from Eragon. Continue reading

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What’s in a Fantasy Prologue?

TL;DR: A prologue isn’t always necessary for a hero’s tale, but if included, should come out of necessity, less it slows down the narration. It should also attempt to encapsulate the essence of the story.

The story of a new hero should start with the seeds of the old, beginning and ending, death and rebirth. Therefore there might be a story before the story, a prologue, which, as all good prologues do, contain the essence of the narrative to come so the audience knows what’s in store. We see this in many massive fantasy and sci-fi epics, in many cases disengaging the readers right from the very beginning. Whatever the case, the conflicting ideas of the story are in many cases represented by the old hero and his foe under the black and white, almost indistinguishable dichotomy of good and evil.

Although there are many examples, the best I can think of is the confrontation between Lews Therin Telamon and Elan Morin Tedronai in the prologue of Robert Jordan’s The Eye of the World. Continue reading

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